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Queer fandom nowadays has become a global phenomenon. It helps exemplify the complexities, anxieties, conflicts, and negotiations within and surrounding the collision of global, national, and regional cultures. Some of its subdivided fields, such as Western slash and Japanese Boys’ Love (BL), have received significant academic attention since 1980s (e.g., Aoyama, 1988; Bacon-Smith 1992; Buckley 1991; Fujimoto 1991; Jenkins 1992; Kinsella 1998; Matsui 1993; Penley 1992; Russ 1985). Especially in recent years, the distributions and interpretations of BL across language and geographical boundaries, the distinctiveness and similarities between BL and slash genres, the pornographic aspect of BL, slash, and other forms of queer fannish productions have been emphasized in a body of scholarly literature worldwide (e.g., Brienza 2009; Chao 2013; Galbraith 2011; Glasspool 2013; Isaksson 2009; Keft-Kennedy 2008; Levi 2009; Levi & McHarry & Pagliassotti 2010; Martin 2012; McLelland 2000; Meyer 2013; Mizoguchi 2008; Nagaike 2003; Nagaike 2009; Pagliassotti 2009; Penley 1991; Perper & Cornog 2002; Sabucco 2003; Shamoon 2012; Silvio 2011; Welker 2006; Wood 2006; Wood 2013; Zanghellini 2009).

Meanwhile, the blooming of Chinese queer fandoms in the past two decades has also offered rich sites of queer representations of gender and sexuality. Greatly shaped by Chinese traditional romantic literature, Japanese BL, and Western slash cultures (Feng 2009; Xu & Yang 2013; Yang & Bao 2012; Zheng 2009), contemporary Chinese queer fan cultures have been enjoying a growing diversity. The objects Chinese fans queerly fantasize about are by no means limited to local Chinese celebrities, nor to self-identified queer celebrities. The proliferation of cross-regional, cross-cultural, and transnational Chinese queer fandoms dedicated to androgynous celebrities, queer media, and popular culture is also hard to ignore. Yet, research explicating the intricacies of gender identities, sexual desires, regional differences, national belongings, and global queer cultural convergence and hybridization within Chinese queer fandoms is still far from adequate.

To fill this research gap, this edited collection stresses the struggles, potentials, and dynamics of queerness unveiled within a variety of the fannish contexts of Greater China. Bearing on the intersecting of global cultures studies, post-colonial studies, modern queer theory, and media audience research, we view queerness as a nonstraight spectatorial position (Doty 1993; Kohnen 2008) and/or a productive space (Munoz 1999). Accordingly, we aim to examine Chinese queer fandom as a grassroots cultural palimpsest that reconfigure, contest against, trespass, and/or overturn the dominant scripts of identity and subjectivity.

We seek chapter contributions that elaborate the cultural specificities, significances, transformativity, hybridity, historicity, and futurity epitomized by Chinese queer fan cultures. We are especially keen to receive manuscripts that consider the queer dimensions of gender, sexuality, desire, and fantasy from a wide range of Chinese temporal and geographical settings. We also very welcome submissions that employ interdisciplinary and/or comparative approaches.

Manuscript topics may include but are not limited to:
Ø Genders and Sexualities in Chinese Boys’ Love/Slash and Girls’ Love/Femslash Fandoms
Ø Queerness and Performativity in Fandoms Dedicated to Anime and Cosplay/Role-Play/Life-Play in Greater China
Ø Chinese Queer Readings of Media, Popular Culture, and Celebrities Worldwide
Ø Chinese Queer Fans’ Gender- and Sexuality-Related Identities, Agencies, Subjectivities, Fantasies, Desires, Connections, and Relationships within Fan Communities
Ø Racial Representation, Distant Cultural Construction, and Non-Chinese Imagination in Chinese Queer Fan Cultures
Ø The Interrelationship and Interaction between Chinese Queer Fandoms, Queer Organizations, Queer Movements, Queer Politics, and Queer Grassroots Publics and Communities
Ø Queer, Pornographic Representations of Male/Female Sexualities in Chinese Queer Fandoms
Ø The Transgressiveness, Multivalence, and Constructedness of Masculinities and Femininities in Chinese Fan-Made Queer Productions
Ø Violence, Abuse, and Aggressiveness in Chinese Fan-Made Queer Productions
Ø The Interplay of the Boom of Boys’ Love/Slash and/or Girls’ Love/Femslash Industries, Fans’ Passions for Queering and Queerness, and the Commercialization of and Censorship on Queer Media in Greater China

Note:
We are only interested in academic analytic papers grounded in certain critical/theoretical perspectives that have NOT been published elsewhere.
To submit chapter proposal submissions for consideration, please send a 1000- to 1500-word abstract (outlining the topic, methods, and fan-related materials used) with working bibliography and a CV to the book editors at queerfandom2014@yahoo.com by May 30th, 2014.

Acceptance will be handled on a rolling basis till the end of July, 2014. Early submissions are strongly encouraged.

Completed, well-polished papers from accepted contributors should run between 5,000 to 8,500 words and are expected before the end of December, 2014.

CFP for peer-reviewed online academic journal “View. Theories and Practices of Visual Culture”, issue 5

What is a queer image? The first answer, which comes to mind seems obvious—queer images portray lives of non-normative sexualities and document the existence of ever-changing LGBTQ communities from the present and past. To this, we should also add images created by queer painters, activists, sculptors, film directors, performers, designers.

And then, one could also point to an archive of images important for these queer collectives, a repository filled with artworks by Andy Warhol, musical posters, Douglas Sirk melodramas, music videos by Grace Jones, photo portraits of David Wojnarowicz, boa feathers and blush etc. etc.

This list doesn’t seem satisfactory. This is perhaps because not every representation of a non-normative sexuality has to resist hetero-norms; not every image created by a person identifying as queer has to carry a subversive potential, and finally because a common archive often, after some time, seizes to offer shelter and instead becomes an essentializing trap.

What if we try using queer theory and practice in thinking about the image per se? What would happen if instead of limiting ourselves to identifying queerness in the creator of the image and / or  its content, we start looking for queerness in the image itself – its construction, form, modes of circulation, social functioning?

If we were to provide a notion of a society of images, one possessing its own hierarchies, customs and rules, which images would occupy the position of non-normative images, of weak, subaltern, excluded, poor images? Can queer theory – a political and revolutionary theory per se (even if the means of revolution are not only pride, but also shame; not only joy, but also sadness; sleep, as well as riot, boredom as well as excitement) – which has over the years redefined such basic cultural categories as time, space, the archive, affect, and style, tell us anything new about the theory of the image and (counter)visuality? What do queer images look like? How do images reproduce outside of the hetero-matrix? What assemblages can anti-social images form? What do
queer images want and what kind of desires to they arouse in us? Are some genres more queer than others? What color do they have? What does the geographical map of queer images look like?

In this fifth issue of the journal “View. Theories and Practices of Visual Culture,” we invite contributions about queer images and images of queers. We’re looking forward to reading articles, which criticize normative images of non-normative identities, but also those which look for queerness in normativity; articles about images fighting for emancipation, but also about those bashful and introvert ones; texts about images created as a result of deep intellectual engagement with queer theory, but also about campy images, brought into being by pure accident.

Deadline for articles: January 20, 2014.

For editorial and technical requirements, go to:
http://widok.ibl.waw.pl/index.php/one/about/submissions.

In case of questions, email:
szczesniak.magda@gmail.comredakcja@widok.ibl.waw.pl

Reference / Quellennachweis:
CFP: Queer Images. In: H-ArtHist, Oct 15, 2013.
<http://arthist.net/archive/6168>.

The 20th Out In Africa Gay & Lesbian Film Festival’s 2013 final edition takes place in Jozi at Nu Metro Hyde Park and in CT at both Nu Metro and Cinema Nouveau V&AC Waterfront from 18-27 October.  For film trailers, workshops and all other info, check out our website here

Bookings will open on Monday, 30th September

OIA will be opened in Jozi on Wednesday 16 October by Justice Edwin Cameron. The Opening Night speaker in CT, on Thursday 17 October, is still to be confirmed.

The sure-fire hit of the Festival will be the French title Blue is the Warmest Colour, Abdellatif Kechiche’s 3-hour epic, awarded the Cannes Palme d’Or by a jury headed by Steven Spielberg. Courtesy of Ster Kinekor Cinema Nouveau, this will be the South African Première. It will screen at Nu Metro Hyde Park and Cinema Nouveau V&A Waterfront.

Continuing the French theme is the documentary Louis(e) de Ville, portrait of a bad girl!   This is not to be missed by anyone.  Louis(e), a guest of the Festival courtesy of the French Embassy / IFAS will attend all screenings, and perform her inimitable style of live burlesque in both cities. Intelligent, articulate and political, she performs in burlesque shows throughout Europe. Details of her performances and workshops are on the OIA website. Portrait screens as a double bill with In their Room: London directed by Travis Mathews, who often collaborates with James Franco. In their rooms are a surprising cross-section of gay men who share what’s on their minds and.. Intelligent and insightful, compulsive and compelling, voyeuristic and sometimes just plain crazy, the film is also surprisingly tender.

German director Patrick Schuckmann will present his film Lose Your Head, a tense and sexy psychological thriller based on the true story. Luis, a young Spaniard, comes to summery Berlin to party and meets the sexy, intriguing Viktor. It all becomes scary and sinister when a Greek woman mistakes Luis for her brother who has disappeared.

Schuckmann will run Script Writing workshops in Jozi and Cape Town.

Another German offering is the award winning Free Fall (Freier Fall) directed by Stephan Lacant.  Set far from the gay world, it is a gritty, intense study of a riot squad policeman whose life comes apart when he falls for a colleague.  Beautifully shot, exquisitely acted, Free Fall is part Brokeback Mountain, part Undertow.

Director Rodney Evans, a guest of the 2005 Festival with Brother to Brother, has delivered a well-scripted, often pin-sharp delving into the new rules of engagement as permanence makes way for pleasure in The Happy Sad. Here two couples, one (nearly) straight, one gay, find themselves exploring alternatives to the usual ’til-death-do-us-part monogamy roundabout, with intriguing consequences and more twists than a 5th Avenue pretzel.

Doug Spearman’s Hot Guys with Guns is a modern take on the old-fashioned detective story. It’s Chinatown meets Boystown. A series of raids on exclusive parties leaves a raft of LA’s most influential gay men high and dry. Will our amateur PIs catch the bastards, or just the clap? By turns tense and dramatic, it’s also titillating, funny, cruisey, filled with Hollywood insider-humour and some pretty decent acting. Lots of fun.

Out in the Dark, directed by Michael Mayer, is a multi-award winning Israeli film that delivers a gripping tale of love that both comments on, and uses the backdrop of, Israeli-Palestinian politics to great effect. Palestinian Nimr sneaks across the border at night to the gay bars of Tel Aviv where he meets the sexy Israeli lawyer, Roy.  The cinematography, music and editing all contribute to an edgy, urgent drama of star-crossed lovers.

And for a truly South African experience the Festival includes a programme of three local shorts: Benedicte Roumega’s White Lies, set in a Cape Town hair salon, starring Alan Committee; Oko Macanda’s  Somagwazaabout two boys undergoing their initiation into the world of men; and Duan Myburgh’s DIFF award winning tale of love and revenge, The Brave Unseen

Out In Africa

www.oia.co.za

Booking details:

Nu Metro (Jozi and CT): R53 all concessions apply www.numetro.co.za

Call Centre:  8am to  8pm:  0861 246 362

In CT – Blue is the Warmest Colour screens at Cinema Nouveau:  R63 all concessions apply

For bookings and info visit www.cinemanouveau.co.za or call  Ticketline on 082 16789

The Festival is sponsored by

The National Film & Video Foundation, HIVOS, The Times, The Astraea Lesbian Foundation for Justice The French Embassy, the ever-generous individuals who subscribe to the 8333 fund and our small businesses 6 Spin Street, Graton Guest House, The Glen Boutique Hotel, Original Cocktails and SoupSaladSandwich

CALL FOR PAPERS
 
International Conference “Gender in focus: (new) trends in media”
June 20-21, 2014
University of Minho (Braga, Portugal)
The Communication and Society Research Centre invites you to submit a proposal for a paper, panel or poster presentation to the upcoming International Conference “Gender in focus: (new) trends in media”.
Over the last decades, a considerable amount of research has been conducted on the relationship of gender with communication. However, new insights are still needed, especially those that explore the interrelations and negotiations between media and gender through the use of interdisciplinary and intersectional approaches.
This event aims to serve as a forum to discuss ideas, experiences and research results on gender and media, bringing together social sciences researchers, NGOs representatives and media professionals.
Topics of interest for submission include, but are not limited to, the following:
• Femininities and/or Masculinities Representations in Media
• Gender and Media Trends
• Gender, Media and Public Sphere
• Gender, Advertising and Consumer Culture
• Gender, Audience and Reception Studies
• Gender, Digital Culture and Communication
• Gender, Media Institutions and Communication Policies
• Media and Feminist Theory
• Media Social Networks and Identities
• Media, Gender and Democracy
• Media, Gender and Human rights
• Media, Gender and Intercultural Communication
• Media, Gender and Sexualities
• New Media and Feminist Movements
• Intersectionality and Media
Please submit an abstract for oral paper or poster up to 300 words and a brief authors biography of about 150 words. Panel proposals should consist of a rationale of the panel (300 words), abstracts for individual presenters (150 words each), name of panel chair(s) and a brief authors biography of about 150 words.
Proposals should be submitted through the EasyChair system (https://www.easychair.org/conferences/?conf=gf2014), mentioning name, academic affiliation and contacts. The deadline is February 15, 2014 and the notification of paper, panel or poster acceptance will be no later than March 15, 2014.
The official language of the conference is English.
For more information, please contact us:
Communication and Society Research Centre
Social Sciences Institute
University of Minho
Gualtar Campus
4710-057 Braga – Portugal